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Behavior and Anxiety

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Questions & Answers for Behavior and Anxiety

Question
Problem with behaviour
I have 3 cats two young males one year and two years old and a female aged 6. Earlier this year we lost a cat and eventually adopted two new ones from a shelter. My female, isabelle wants nothing to do with them. She hisses and growls and hides under the bed. She is also using our bath as her litter box! We want her to be happy, all the male cats want to do is play! They are all neutered and spayed. Help!
Dog's Age: Don't have a dog
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 8 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
Emma
 - Tennessee
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
This is a classic problem that you often see with female cats in multi-cat siutations. They can be very difficult.

I recommend a calming collar for her. I also recommend that you begin introducing them via a cat carrier. Put one of the two male cats (Male #1) in the carrier and put it in a main room, like the living room. Keep the other one (Male #2) in a separate room. Bring the resident cat into the living room and allow to roam freely. Remove her within a minute or two, preferably before either hisses or growls. Watch her body language. Later, do the same thing with Male #2. Then repeat this exercise every day for 10 days, gradually (hopefully) increasing the time the resident cat roams around the "carrier" cat.

Then, put the resident cat in the carrier and allow Male#1 to roam freely, again, for just a minute or two. Later that day, do the same thing with Male#2. As before, continue to increase the time they spend together, always aiming to separate them before any antagonism erupts. You want to be reward desirable behavior and not undesirable behavior. You also want their last impression of their "visit" to be a positive one, and to build on that positivity for the next "session".

Feed them in different corners of the room and make sure you have at least 3 litter boxes, preferably 4.

This will take patience and consistency on your part. Keep me posted with their progress.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 8 months ago by
by
DrJeffWerber
 
Products from my answer
Stress Relief Calming Spray
5 out of 5(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
answer 2
New cats should be gradually introduced to the resident cat to minimize this type of problem. This would mean keeping them separated and allowing interaction for a limited time each day gradually increasing the interaction time until they are comfortable with each other. having several litter boxes is also recommended, one for each cat, plus one additonal if possible. Then each cat can claim a box as his own.
Dog's Age: Don't have a dog
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Number One Contributor
Number One Contributor
answered 3 years, 8 months ago by
by
czamojcin
Question
5-yr old female started urinating on the sofa and bed...why?
The litter box is cleaned everyday. Both of my cats have been using the litterbox without incident for about 3 years. My other cat is a 14-year old male. He is sometimes aggressive with her, but nothing that has caused any serious problem. Within the last couple of weeks, my 5-yr old female started urinating on bedding, sofa, etc. I put on the ProPet collar and it did calm her down, but after a couple of days she is still doing it, albeit, doesn't seem as often. How long does it take for the effects of the collar to work? Will she have to wear the collar for the rest of her life? Any other suggestions?
Dog's Age: Don't have a dog
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 8 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
Jeff
 
Products related to my question
 
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
The problem sounds to be more likely behavioral than not. The collar could take a while to achieve maximum benefit. Each cat responds differently, so I would continue to use the collar.

I would also add a litter box, perhaps with a different type of litter. It's always difficult to figure out the things that can tick off a female cat. You'll need to experiment with placement of litter boxes, additional boxes, different types of litter, etc.

If it is caused by objections she has to the male, try to separate them a bit and see if that helps. It is possible that, at his age, he has started to leak urine, which she might be responding to by leaving some of her own around.

I would also try a pheromone spray. Spray it in the areas she has urinated to keep her from re-marking.

Let me know how this works.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 7 months ago by
by
DrJeffWerber
 
Products from my answer
Stress Relief Calming Spray
5 out of 5(1)
 
 
 
 
 
answer 2
Thank you for your interest in our product. The Anti-Stress Calming Collar works within hours of use. A collar lasts for about 3 months. If it is helping she may need to wear one always. A health issue could cause a change in behavior, it is suggested to check with your vet .
Dog's Age: Don't have a dog
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Staff Answer
answered 3 years, 7 months ago by
by
DebrafromCustomerCare
Question
After we moved to a new apartment, our cat has started urinating on the furniture, especially the new pieces. Any suggestions?
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
The first thing to do is get a good odor neutralizer such as Nature's Miracle and get the odor out of the couches as much as possible. You might have to get them professionally cleaned or replace the inner cushions if they're saturated and can't be neutralized.

Then, booby trap the couches. Use tin foil, double sided tape, a scat mat or those plastic carpet runners with the barbs on the bottom faced up on top of the couches. Place a litter box right near the couches.

As the cat starts to use the litter box for urination, little by little move the box a few inches at a time back to the area that is convenient for you and accessible for her.

You might also try a pheromone spray and/or an herbal calming formula. I'm assuming that your cat is spayed but if she's not, that might also help.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
DrJeffWerber
Question
I have a male cat, he’s been fixed and is 1 year old. My grandson found a female about 8 wks old. The male hisses at her. How can I stop this?
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
First please realize that often when a new pet is introduced, the resident pet goes through a phase where they are upset, suspicious, unfriendly, but this most often works itself out. In your case, because the new kitty is female, it is even more likely they will form a relationship.

To help them along, feed them near one another, but not together. Little by little, move their bowls closer together. You may also notice that when she is occupied, he will get closer and want to sniff her.

Play with him in her presence to show him that when she is around it's good for him!
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
DrJeffWerber
Question
Cat has started sleeping in her litterbox. What should I do?
I have just recently moved into a new house and I have a male and a female cat. They stay in very roomy cat cages in the garage. The male is fine but the female has started sleeping in her litter box. She will not sleep in the cat bed I have for her. She is fine in the house and I started using your Calming Spray one week ago and she has stopped tearing up her cage (turning over water/food, tearing up the carpet and howling all night). But she still sleeps in the litter box. Is this an unhealthy habit? Do you have any ideas on how to break this habit?
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
The litter box provides a sense of security, which might make it attractive to your cat after a move. Try to keep her in her large cage at night, without the litter box in it, and spray inside the box to see if you can get her to like the box by itself.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
DrJeffWerber
Question
My two cats can't seem to get along. Any advice?
I’ve recently taken in a friend’s female cat. The problem I am having is that my cat and she do not get along. If my cat PJ gets with in 5' of her she starts hissing and growling. She hides in the spare bedroom under the bed. If I leave the door open then she will not eat or drink and does all of her duties under the bed. So to make matters worse for the last 6 months I've left the door closed so she will eat, drink, and use the litter box. I think PJ would love to play with her but she won't have any of it.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
You might want to try a calming spray with pheromones, and also perhaps an herbal calming remedy, both of which are available over the counter. It sounds like you’ve created a whole, safe environment for your visiting cat, which would be my first recommendation. Once the visiting cat is comfortable and secure in it’s own environment, the next step is to put it into a carrier and bring it into a common area. Leave it in there for about 10 minutes every day for two or three days, allowing the resident cat to walk around the carrier and possibly interact with the visiting cat. Then, put your resident cat in the carrier and leave it in the common area for about 10 minutes, allowing the visiting cat to freely roam in that area. This should help build tolerance and security. After you’ve done this for about 7 days, have the cats eat in the same room, keeping their bowls initially quite far apart. Then, little by little, bring the bowls closer together. See how this works and let me know your progress.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
DrJeffWerber
Question
Why does my cat "knead" me?
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
Kneading is a cute behavior to watch cats flex and extend their paws against a bedspread, the carpet, or a person, usually while stretching and purring. It's a very common behavior for cats, but no one has determined exactly why they do it. All sorts of theories exist. Some say that "kneading" cats were weaned from their mothers too early; some say they were weaned too late. Most likely it's just a habit some cats develop, like people that bite their nails or crack their knuckles. What theorists do know is that it's a sign that cats are comfortable, happy, and relaxed. So you can take it as a complement: it's your cat's way of saying that he's happy you're around!
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
AAHA
Question
My cat is urinating all over the house. Is this territorial? What can be done about it?
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
If you've not done so already, have him thoroughly examined by your veterinarian to make sure he has no underlying problems causing him to urinate excessively. Many diseases or infections will cause excessive urination. If there are no medical problems, then the urination is likely a behavioral problem. Your cat may be marking his territory, or he may have some problem with the litter box you're using: the type, amount, or cleanliness of the litter; the location of the box, etc. Sudden changes or stress such as introducing a new cat or dog to the household, moving, or the addition of a new family member can cause a cat to stop using his litter box, as well. If your cat is not neutered, then it is highly recommend that that be done. How many litter boxes do you have? What kind of litter are you using? The litter box should be cleaned at least once daily. If you've recently changed litter brands, change back! Cats can be very particular about the kind of litter they use. If you haven't changed litter, try adding another box with a completely different type of litter in it. Most cats prefer scoopable (clumping), unscented litter in uncovered boxes. Stay away from litters with lots of fragrance. As an experiment, try putting three (at least) litter boxes in your house. Place them right at or near the exact spots where he's urinating inappropriately, and scoop all boxes daily. This is just one example of things you can try. If your cat is still urinating outside the box, consult with your veterinarian or a pet behaviorist. Another option is medical therapy. Discuss medications with your veterinarian. You may need to give your cat a pill once a day or once a week, depending on the medication. Some of the medications have side effects and some don't work very well. It really depends on the cat, and it may take some experimentation to solve the problem. Litter box problems can be very difficult to correct, especially if they have been going on for a while. In most cases, however, they CAN be solved; so don't give up too easily!
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
AAHA
Question
How do I introduce a two-month-old male kitten to my five-year-old female cat?
Dog's Age: Under 2 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
First, make sure that your kitten is healthy prior to introducing him to your older cat. Before bringing him home, take him to your veterinarian for a complete exam, including laboratory testing (your veterinarian may wish to do a leukemia test). It is best to introduce the kitten to your cat slowly ? don?t force them to interact. A gradual process of discovery and investigation is best. Bring the kitten into the house in a travel crate and let your older cat approach the crate and sniff, hiss and paw at it. Then reverse the situation by putting the older cat in the crate and let the kitten explore around the crate. When both cats appear comfortable, allow them to roam freely together under your direct supervision. You should expect some hesitation and hissing from either or both cats during their first encounter. Once they seem relatively calm, feed them together in the same general vicinity, but not right next to each other. Separate them after the feeding. As they become gradually calmer, allow them to spend progressively longer periods together each day until they seem to be completely comfortable. Make sure you have at least two litter boxes ? one for each cat. It may take a week or two for them to become comfortable, but they should gradually adapt to each other. Be patient. Some cats are less sociable toward others and less willing to share their territory. With time, most cats learn to accept others in the household. Consult your veterinarian for advice if your cats have not become accustomed to one another after a few weeks of interaction.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
AAHA
Question
How can I get my kitten to stop chewing on electrical cords?
I keep finding electrical cords that my eight-month-old kitten is chewing. I've concealed the cords as much as possible and removed the ones I could, but he is persistent in finding them and chewing on them.
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: Under 1 year old
asked 3 years, 11 months ago on Behavior and Anxiety by
by
anonymous
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
It sounds like you have a normal, inquisitive kitten. But chewing on electrical cords is quite dangerous. The good news is that he should start outgrowing this behavior soon. Have you tried putting something distasteful on the cords? Cayenne pepper spray or bitter apple spray can deter some cats from chewing. You can also cover the cords with paper towel tubing or PVC pipe. Your kitty should lose house privileges unless someone is home to supervise him. When you're not at home, put him in a room with no cords. Also, make sure that your kitten has plenty of appropriate toys to play with. One way you can make his toys go further is to put a few out for him to play with, and put the rest away. A few days later, hide the toys that were left out, and leave out some new toys that had been put away. Even old toys will look new to your cat after they've been hidden for a few days. With a bit of persistence, your kitten will start to leave the cords alone. If, in spite of all these precautions, you catch him chewing on the cords, chase him away with a squirt of water from a spray bottle. Don't yell at him or spank him; just calmly squirt him until he leaves the cords alone. Good luck with your kitten!
Dog's Age: 2 years old to 7 years old
Cat's Age: 1 year old to 8 years old
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 11 months ago by
by
AAHA
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